| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Stop wasting time looking for files and revisions. Connect your Gmail, DriveDropbox, and Slack accounts and in less than 2 minutes, Dokkio will automatically organize all your file attachments. Learn more and claim your free account.

View
 

Mealer, Crystal

Page history last edited by Crystal Mealer 9 years, 9 months ago

´╗┐

Topic 1, Assignment 1

 

 

Please note: there are some redundancies in these strategies. I have included "Digital Strategies and Technologies" that can be used in the classroom setting and/or in distance learning.

 

Traditional Strategies
Digital Strategies and Technologies
Teacher writing on the chalkboard (implied).
ELMO presenter (projector), other data projector (for Powerpoint presentations, for example), online whiteboard.
Individual/small group assistance from teacher, nearly impossible (implied). Individual and small group assistance from teacher offered asynchronously through email or discussion board.
Student raising hand to ask a question (implied). "Hand-raising" is a feature in synchronous online classes, also questions can be asked via email, discussion boards, etc., clickers can be used in the classroom.
Desks in rows facing front, immobile (stated). If "desks facing front" is considered a strategy to keep attention focused on the instructor, then visually interesting presentations would serve the purpose better (both in the physical and the virtual classroom).

Monologue, probably with microphone, by teacher (because of sound issues) (stated).

Monologue is necessary in large classroom (primarily because of sound issues). In the online class, all students may participate in class discussion. This give-and-take is not a digital version of the same strategy, but rather a better strategy.
Note-taking by students (stated).
A digital alternative to note-taking would be use of digital recorder.
Passive attention by students (stated).
Use of clickers or expectation of online participation would require active attention by students - a better strategy.
Reading books (students), availability of books is declining (stated).
Full-text titles available online, often free through Google books, campus library, etc.
Speak to teacher outside of class, availability is declining (stated).
Email, discussion board, text message, Facebook message, etc.
Computer grading, short assignments (stated)
Computer grading actually is a technological strategy. Peer review in an online environment might be used to calculate some grades, in order to obtain grades for more lengthy and complicated work that a single instructor would not have time to review. Peer reviews could be done via wiki pretty easily (as we've learned!)
Discussion among students (declining or non-existent) (stated). Discussions possible on class wikis and blogs, through texting, tweeting, and online chat, on discussion boards in Blackboard, via email, via Skype, etc.
Give students break (after 20 minutes, for example) (stated). There is no technological substitute for a "break." In an asynchronous online class, of course, students take their breaks at their own discretion.
Ask students to write down questions and to check whether other students know the answers; THEN invite students to ask questions of teacher (stated). Students can interact on online discussion board before directing questions to instructor
Assign brief problem or task during break, encourage collaboration. Have students apply what has been learned, first in class, then outside of class. (stated) In a synchronous online environment, the same strategy can be used - students can be broken out into groups in separate "rooms." In an asynchronous environment, students may be encouraged to form study groups for a particular task or can be assigned to groups.
Establish in-class collaborative groups (stated) Groups can be established in an online environment, synchronous or asynchronous. Collaboration during class time (in synchronous environment) can occur in breakout rooms, or at other times via email, wiki, Google docs, etc.
Display instructions for groups on overhead projector (stated) This "traditional" strategy does actually use technology. In an online class, the "display" could be on a whiteboard (in Blackboard for example), on a wiki or other webpage, in an email message, etc. In a traditional classroom, more current technology could be used: LCD data projector, ELMO presenter, etc.
Establish signal to get groups' attention to end task and move on (stated). If task is online, it can be automatically timed and automatically ended. For in-class tasks, a small kitchen timer can be displayed via an ELMO presenter and the sound of the "buzzer" can be amplified.
Request students' help in establishing order (stated). Use clickers (onscreen message: "click when you're paying attention").
Games and simulations, be creative (stated). Online Games, Avatars, and Simulations (ask Xan!)

 

 

Part 2

 

F2F
Blended

Online

ELMO presenter (projector), other data projector (for Powerpoint presentations, for example)
ELMO presenter (projector), other data projector (for Powerpoint presentations, for example)
 
  Online Whiteboard
Online Whiteboard
 
Individual and small group assistance from teacher offered asynchronously through email or discussion board. Individual and small group assistance from teacher offered asynchronously through email or discussion board.
 
"Hand-raising" is a feature in synchronous online classes, also questions can be asked via email, discussion boards, etc., "Hand-raising" is a feature in synchronous online classes, also questions can be asked via email, discussion boards, etc.,
Clickers Clickers  
Visually interesting presentations Visually interesting presentations Visually interesting presentations
Digital recorder Digital recorder  
Full-text titles available online, often free through Google books, campus library, etc. Full-text titles available online, often free through Google books, campus library, etc. Full-text titles available online, often free through Google books, campus library, etc.
 
Email, discussion board, text message, Facebook message, etc. Email, discussion board, text message, Facebook message, etc.
  Discussions possible on class wikis and blogs, through texting, tweeting, and online chat, on discussion boards in Blackboard, via email, via Skype, etc. Discussions possible on class wikis and blogs, through texting, tweeting, and online chat, on discussion boards in Blackboard, via email, via Skype, etc.
  In a synchronous online environment, the same strategy can be used - students can be broken out into groups in separate "rooms." In an asynchronous environment, students may be encouraged to form study groups for a particular task or can be assigned to groups. In a synchronous online environment, the same strategy can be used - students can be broken out into groups in separate "rooms." In an asynchronous environment, students may be encouraged to form study groups for a particular task or can be assigned to groups.
  Collaboration during class time (in synchronous environment) can occur in breakout rooms, or at other times via email, wiki, Google docs, etc. Collaboration during class time (in synchronous environment) can occur in breakout rooms, or at other times via email, wiki, Google docs, etc.
  If task is online, it can be automatically timed and automatically ended. If task is online, it can be automatically timed and automatically ended.
For in-class tasks, a small kitchen timer can be displayed via an ELMO presenter and the sound of the "buzzer" can be amplified. For in-class tasks, a small kitchen timer can be displayed via an ELMO presenter and the sound of the "buzzer" can be amplified.  
Use clickers (onscreen message: "click when you're paying attention"). Use clickers (onscreen message: "click when you're paying attention").  
  Online Games, Avatars, and Simulations (ask Xan!) Online Games, Avatars, and Simulations (ask Xan!)

 

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.